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Unknown Structure Discovered Under Sand Near Great Pyramid Of Giza In Massive Breakthrough For Researchers

How many more secrets can we uncover from the Egyptians?

The structure is located near the Western Cemetery. (Google Maps/Archaeological Prospection)

The discovery of an odd building buried beneath the ground close to the Great Pyramid of Giza may have helped archaeologists in Egypt achieve a significant scientific breakthrough.

The discoveries made by workers at the site continue to flow in, even centuries after the pyramids were first constructed.

Researchers from Egypt's National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, Japan's Higashi Nippon International University, and Tohoku University presented the latest findings in detail in a study that was released on May 5.

The structure, which is approximately 33 by 49 feet in size and has a peculiar L-shaped design, is situated next to the Great Pyramid of Khufu, popularly known as the Great Pyramid of Giza, and lies between 1.5 and 6 feet below the surface of the Western Cemetery.

Because the structure is entirely filled with sand, unlike the pyramids that rise above the ground, scholars think it might have been filled after it was built.

The mysteries don't stop there, as beneath the structure, at a depth between about 16 and 33 feet, is what the team described as a 'highly electrically resistive anomaly' measuring about 33 by 33 feet.

The structure is located near the Western Cemetery. (Google Maps/Archaeological Prospection)
The structure is located near the Western Cemetery. (Google Maps/Archaeological Prospection)

According to the researchers, 'electrically resistive material in a sand dune can be a mixture of sand and gravel, including sparse spacing or air voids within it'.

Given that King Khufu's family members are buried there above burial pits, the structure's location in the Western Cemetery is contributing to the formation of certain ideas around it.

But the region where the new structure was discovered didn't appear to contain any tombs; instead, it was just a patch of sand.

"There are no significant remains above ground in this area, but is there really nothing below the ground?," the team asked in their report.

"No underground investigations have previously been carried out."

Using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), the researchers mapped the area and have hypothesized that the upper structure 'could be vertical walls of limestone or shafts'.

Below, the archeologists believe there could be a tomb - though they've stressed that a 'more detailed survey would be required in order to confirm this possibility'.

The structure was filled in after being built. (Archaeological Prospection)
The structure was filled in after being built. (Archaeological Prospection)

The team's analysis of the finding's importance was published in the journal Archaeological Prospection, where the research was first published in 2021. You can read the analysis here.

“We believe that the continuity of the shallow structure and the deep large structure is important,” they wrote.

However, further research must be done before the real relevance can be determined.