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'A Boy and His Dog' Adapter LQ Jones Passes Away

'A Boy and His Dog' Adapter LQ Jones Passes Away

The actor, director, producer is survived by his two sons and a daughter and was one of the most influential filmmakers of his time.

Actor and director LQ Jones who was known primarily for his roles in the Sam Peckinpah Classics died on July 9, 2022, at 94 years old. He died of natural causes at his home in the Hollywood Hills. Jones’ death was confirmed by his grandson, Erté deGarces. DeGarces shared that Jones died surrounded by his family, Variety reported.



 

His career spanned seven decades and included many acting and directorial projects that gave him opportunities to work with incredibly established directors of the 20th century, including Walsh, Don Siegel for An Annapolis Story and Mervyn LeRoy for Toward the Unknown. He was also a regular supporting player in Sam Peckinpah’s action-heavy westerns, with roles in The Wild Bunch, Ride the High Country, Major Dundee, The Battle of Cable Hogue and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. Near the end of the century, Jones also took roles in Martin Campbell’s The Mask of Zorro, Roland Emmerich’s The Patriot and Martin Scorsese’s Casino.



 

Before changing his name he went by Justice Ellis McQueen. He was born on Aug.19, 1927, in Beaumont, Texas, Jones where he also attended the University of Texas at Austin. He took up the name LQ Jones with his first film Battle Cry and continued with this stage name to date with his most current role being Robert Altman’s final film A Prairie Home Companion which came out in 2006. Apart from such an illustrious career in film, he also had a striking career in television. He mostly appeared in western series including Gunsmoke, The Virginian, Wagon Train, Rawhide, The Rifleman, Have Gun – Will Travel and The Big Valley.



 

And if this wasn’t enough, he even took up and produced four independent featurettes. In 1975, he produced, wrote and directed the film A Boy and His Dog adapted from Harlan Ellison’s novella of the same name. He originally approached the project as an executive producer, however, he was driven to take more initiative after collaborators working on the film fell through. 



 

Dubbed as his magnum opus, the film follows a teenage boy and his telepathic dog as they fight for survival in the southwestern U.S. in 2024, a time when nuclear fallout grips the world. Starring a young Don Johnson and Jason Robards, Jones’ fellow Peckinpah alum, the film has garnered the reputation of a cult classic over the years, with Jones stating that director George Miller cited it as an influence for his Mad Max series. 

The black comedy director is survived by his sons, Randy McQueen and Steve Marshall, and daughter, Mindy McQueen. 

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