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Katy Perry's House Fight With 84-Year-Old Veteran Inspires New Bill Called The Katy Perry Act

Because of Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom's suit with a veteran, the Katy PERRY act was made.

Katy Perry

Katy Perry and her fiancé Orlando Bloom were in a tricky lawsuit with a veteran homeowner who sold them a house in 2020.

Carl Westcott's property was purchased by the celebrity couple for a whopping $15 million in July 2020, but the 84-year-old, who claims to have been on 'several intoxicating pain-killing opiates' at the time - apparently 'did not want to sell his home'.

According to court documents, he was told in 2015 that he had Huntington's Disease, a genetic brain disease.

And just a few days before the deal was signed, Westcott had a "major six-hour" surgery on his back, which put him on "multiple opiate medications."

Carl Westcott surrounded by family as he battles Huntington disease.
Facebook - Kameron Westcott
Carl Westcott surrounded by family as he battles Huntington disease. Facebook - Kameron Westcott

According to records from the Los Angeles County Superior Court, the multiple opiate medications, which were a synthetic form of morphine, confused and drunk [Westcott], making it impossible for him to understand or reason about the terms and consequences of the contract. They also seriously impaired [Westcott's] mental faculties to the point where he was not of sound mind and could not give his free, voluntary, or intelligent consent to the contract.

"The contract that [Westcott] signed to sell his home is therefore void or voidable."

Chart Westcott, his son, and the rest of his family are now pushing for a law called the Protecting Elderly Realty for Retirement Years Act.

It's also been called "The Katy Perry act."

Its website states: "The Katy PERRY Act addresses the risks of elder financial abuse, especially as it relates to property and real estate sales and transfers.

"The Act establishes a 72 hour cool-down period during which either party involved in a contract for conveyance of a personal residence, in which one party is over the age of 75, can rescind the agreement without penalty."

On its page, the act talks about how "elder fraud" or "financial elder abuse" is "a rampant issue in the United States."

"In fact, the prevalence of online fraud targeting seniors increased by 400 percent in recent years, according to the FBI.

"The Federal Trade Commission also reported that in 2020, individuals aged 60 and older filed over 93,000 complaints related to fraud, with reported losses exceeding $500 million.

"Additionally, the rate of cognitive impairment and/or dementia are 15 percent by age 75 and 20 percent by age 80."

It concludes: "There are currently no laws to protect senior citizens against real estate transactions that unfairly target older individuals whose mental capacities may be compromised at the time of sale.

"The PERRY Act addresses the risks of elder financial abuse, especially as it relates to property and real estate sales and transfers."